USA: William Taylor had ‘clear understanding’ of Ukraine quid pro quo

Ambassador William Taylor is escorted by U.S. Capitol Police as he arrives to testify before House committees as part of the Democrats' impeachment investigation of President Trump at the Capitol on Tuesday.
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WASHINGTON (AP) — A State Department envoy told lawmakers it was his “clear understanding” the U.S. government intended to withhold military aid from Ukraine until the country committed to investigations sought by President Donald Trump, including into a political rival, according to a transcript of the closed-door interview released Wednesday.

William Taylor told impeachment investigators he understood that the security assistance, and not just a White House meeting for Ukraine’s new president, was conditioned on the country committing to investigations of Joe Biden and also Democrats’ actions in the 2016 election.

“That was my clear understanding, security assistance money would not come until the president committed to pursue the investigation,” Taylor said.

He was asked if he was aware that “quid pro quo” meant “this for that.”

“I am,” he replied.

The testimony from Taylor, the top U.S. diplomat in Ukraine, further connects the Trump administration to a quid-pro-quo agreement involving Ukraine that is now at the heart of the House impeachment inquiry.

Release of the transcript came as the Democrats launched a major new phase of the investigation with public hearings scheduled for next week featuring State Department officials, including Taylor.

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, who is leading the impeachment investigation, said the committee would also hear from career department official George Kent and former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch next Wednesday and Friday.

All three have already testified behind closed doors in the first phase of the investigation. Yovanovitch, who was ousted in May at Trump’s direction, told investigators she had been told to “watch my back” and that people were “looking to hurt” her. Both Kent and Taylor testified about their concerns about her dismissal as the president’s lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, took a leading role on Ukraine policy.

Trump has denied any wrongdoing. But despite those denials, Schiff said Wednesday that the witnesses will show that “the most important facts are largely not contested” in the inquiry.

“Those open hearings will be an opportunity for the American people to evaluate the witnesses for themselves, to make their own determinations about the credibility of the witnesses, but also to learn firsthand about the facts of the president’s misconduct,” Schiff said.

The Democrats are investigating Trump’s requests for Ukrainian action as the U.S. withheld military aid from the country, which faces threats from its neighbor Russia. Trump, backed by Giuliani, asked new Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy in a July telephone call to probe Biden and his family and to investigate Ukraine’s possible role in the 2016 presidential election.

The Democrats are looking for connections between Yovanovitch’s dismissal, the holdup in military assistance for Ukraine and Trump’s push for the country to open investigations.

In his appearance last month, Taylor told lawmakers that it was the “unanimous opinion of every level of interagency discussion” that the military aid should be resumed without delay. He said the Ukrainians recognized that they had to commit to investigations to get the aid.

“I think it was becoming clear to the Ukrainians that, in order to get this meeting that they wanted, they would have to commit to pursuing these investigations,” Taylor said. And they thought that opening the investigations, in particular on the gas company Burisma, which had hired Biden’s son, would have involved Ukraine in the 2020 election campaign in the U.S.

They didn’t want to do that, he said.

The three committees that have been leading the investigation appear to be wrapping up the closed-door testimony this week. Schiff stepped out of an interview with David Hale, the State Department’s third-ranking official, to announce the public hearings.

Democrats started releasing transcripts from those interviews this week, part of the new public phase of the probe.

In transcripts released Monday and Tuesday, State Department officials detailed Yovanovitch’s ouster and Giuliani’s dealings with the department, White House and Ukraine.

Gordon Sondland, Trump’s ambassador to the European Union, said in an addendum to his testimony released Tuesday that military assistance to the East European ally was being withheld until Ukraine’s new president agreed to release a statement about fighting corruption as Trump wanted.

Taylor also detailed his thinking when he texted Kurt Volker, the U.S. special representative to Ukraine, and Sondland that he would quit if Zelenskiy gave an interview promising the investigations Trump wanted and then the military aid was never released. That text, in which Taylor described that scenario as his “nightmare,” was previously released by congressional investigators.

In questioning, Taylor said that the “Russians are paying attention to how much support the Americans are going to provide the Ukrainians.”

“The Russians want to know how much support the Ukrainians are going to get in general, but also what kind of support from the Americans. So the Russians are loving, would love, the humiliation of Zelenskiy at the hand of the Americans, and would give the Russians a freer hand, and I would quit.”

MARY CLARE JALONICK and ERIC TUCKER I Associated Press

Associated Press writers Colleen Long, Ben Fox, Laurie Kellman, Michael Balsamo and Matthew Daly contributed to this report.

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