Saudi Prince Mohammad Bin Salman buying Manchester United, despite journalist death

The CIA believes Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman ordered the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi in Istanbul

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Manchester United are set for a stunning takeover bid as Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince prepares a £4billion offer for the club.

Critics of the oil-rich nation’s government are horrified at the idea of the Saudi royals buying into English football after the kingdom admitted for the first time that Khashoggi died in their consulate.

The Crown Prince is worth £850billion and is hoping to meet the Glazers in the coming weeks.

Saudi Arabia had suggested that Khashoggi left the consulate alive, but now claim he died in a fistfight.

Nevertheless, the Premier League would ultimately have to follow the lead of the British government.

And despite the present situation, it is very unlikely the authorities would block Saudi investment in football or, indeed, any other business sector.

For all the tough talking by the UK, America and other western nations about Khashoggi, they all need good relations with Saudi Arabia to meet political and economic goals.

English football has an owners and directors test which Premier League and Football League apply to their member clubs in addition to UK company law.

But blocking an individual or entity who would otherwise be permitted to invest in the UK-based company would open up the leagues to legal action.

The Khashoggi case means any progress with the Saudi interest in United will have to be kept under wraps for the sake of appearances, but nothing more.
The biggest obstacle is the attitude of the Glazer family to selling all or some of their stake in United.

The club, as usual, denied it was for sale in the wake of SunSport’s story about Saudi interest led by Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman.

The Saudi regime are currently embroiled in the scandal of missing journalist Jamal Khashoggi

But City sources indicate that on more than one occasion in the recent past, bankers were made aware that the Glazers were prepared to consider welcoming co-investors.

If the Saudis want to take on Middle East rivals Qatar and the UAE on the football pitch, as sources claim, they will ultimately want control of United.

They might be willing to have a minority stake and commercial tie-ups initially, but not in the long term.

And the Glazers would need a very good reason to give up their cash cow completely.

Although the Premier League’s domestic media rights are no longer rising in value, overseas revenue is still going up and United’s huge commercial operation has room for more growth yet.

On the other hand, the capacity to increase United’s revenues from last season’s record £590m is not limitless and some Glazer family members are more interested in football – as opposed to pure money – than others.

The Crown Price with Theresa May at 10 Downing Street

The possibility of a windfall payment, which would clear the debt the Glazers put on the club to buy it in the first place and leave about £500m for each of the six Glazer children, could tempt one or more of them to sell.

The four major institutional investors in Manchester United plc, which is floated on the New York Stock Exchange, could also put pressure on the Glazers if they believed a buyer was ready to pounce.

Baron Capital Group Inc, Lindsell Train Limited, Lansdowne Partners Limited and Jupiter Asset Management Limited own more than 73 per cent of the publicly-available “A”shares between them.

In theory, they could ask the Glazers to listen to an offer from Saudi Arabia or elsewhere.
– The Sun